Course Instructor Days Times Room
ENGL4330S IYENGAR, SUJATA T 8:00 AM 0149

Description

ENGL 4330S/6330S, a service-learning class, takes Shakespeare into the middle school classroom. We develop tools for use in classrooms (a filmography; a concordance and imagery guide; a promptbook; a staging or adaptation guide), evaluate the usefulness of different Shakespeare editions and media, attend teacher and class meetings at a local middle school, and reflect upon our service and our learning in a series of short papers and a final portfolio project. English majors and Education majors are welcome, but you don't have to be considering a career as a teacher in order to benefit from this class, since we consider more broadly the function of Shakespeare within education and of language arts in society.


We will begin by meeting in PARK HALL. Starting in late August we will begin to visit Hilsman Middle School and to hold class in their Professional Development Classroom. Students will also arrange a time that they can attend, observe, and only if and when appropriate, lead an 8th grade language-arts class at Hilsman.


Hilsman Middle School can be reached on Bus Route 25, which leaves from the stop near the UGA Library at twenty minutes past the hour.

Student Comments from previous years' evals:

 

"As a future teacher, I find my time at Hilsman invaluable and am indebted to Dr. Iyengar for the tremendous opportunity."

 

"Class was fluid and assignments were meant to build on each other and support our final goal, to teach a middle school class a lesson on Shakespeare of our own creating. Dr. I is experienced, well versed, knowledgeable and approachable."

 

"Dr. Iyengar's instruction helped me learn a great deal about many areas and sub-skills of teaching, which I think will be useful to me as an instructor working in any setting."

 

"I think this course is very valuable because of the mixture of new information and new ways of thinking it is bound to offer anyone who takes it. If someone is an education-focused student, they will come away with a new artistic appreciation of Shakespeare and the many ways in which is work is adapted and appropriated. An English major like myself will likely be astonished at the complexity of the pedagogical field and hopefully inspired by the opportunity to work so closely with middle school students (who are so delightful)."

"I feel like I have amassed knowledge in a multitude of different areas that intersect but can also be applied elsewhere- from teaching theories, to behavioral psychology, to A Midsummer Night's Dream, to Shakespeare in general."

Assignments

Principal Course Outcomes

  • Filmographies for Midsummer Night’s Dream   (collaborative; one due in Week Three, the other due in Week Eight, depending on the  Hilsman schedule)
  • Handouts on Shakespeare’s language in Midsummer Night’s Dream (individual and collaborative; individual due Week Four, individual and collaborative on MND in second half of semester depending on Hilsman schedule)
  • Concordance and image analysis for Midsummer Night’s Dream (individual; image analysis due before the mid-point of the semester, depending on Hilsman schedule)
  • Promptbook for one scene from Midsummer Night’s Dream (collaborative; due Week Ten or later)
  • Staging or adaptation for one scene from Midsummer Night’s Dream (collaborative; due Week Ten or later)
  • Regular journals that document and reflect upon service-learning (individual; due weekly or twice-weekly)
  • Final electronic portfolio including introductory reflective essay (individual; due on or before the time of the scheduled final examination. The portfolio replaces the examination).

Disclaimer: The syllabus outlines a basic plan for the course. Deviations may be necessary and will be announced to the class by the instructor online or face-to-face. 

Assignments

Course Objectives

• Develop classroom presentation materials and lesson plans to demonstrate that students understand:

  • Shakespeare's Theatre and its historical contexts, including the so-called authorship debates
  • Differences between modern English and early modern English, and early modern English and Shakespeare's English
  • Goals of the Language Arts Common Core used in many schools nationwide
  • Specific aspects of the plays we are studying, including plot, character, dramatic structure, imagery, motifs, and language

• Produce reviews, filmographies, web-sites, curricular modules and bibliographies to show that students can evaluate potential classroom materials for use in schools including

  • different play editions
  • international film versions of the plays studied
  • multimedia and web resources
  • teachers' guides such as Shakespeare Set Free
  • secondary source materials such as Shakespeare Alive!
  • primary sources such as historical documents and paintings

•Write evaluative journal entries that show students know how to continue their life-long education

  • in Shakespeare Studies
  • in Language Arts
  • in Education

• Write narrative journal entries to show student engagement with:

  • middle school students
  • middle school teachers
  • the challenges of teaching and studying in a Middle school in Athens-Clarke County
  • making language, literature, and learning accessible to students of different income levels, abilities, and interests
  • countering  patronizing or defeatist attitudes about who can "do" Shakespeare

•Write reflective journal entries to demonstrate students' deepening analysis of the learning environment and their awareness of themselves as:

  • role models and model learners
  • students and citizens
  • advocates for lifelong learning through reading and writing
  •  
Requirements

Principal Course Outcomes

  • Filmographies for Midsummer Night’s Dream   (collaborative; one due in Week Three, the other due in Week Eight, depending on the  Hilsman schedule)
  • Handouts on Shakespeare’s language in Midsummer Night’s Dream (individual and collaborative; individual due Week Four, individual and collaborative on MND in second half of semester depending on Hilsman schedule)
  • Concordance and image analysis for Midsummer Night’s Dream (individual; image analysis due before the mid-point of the semester, depending on Hilsman schedule)
  • Promptbook for one scene from Midsummer Night’s Dream (collaborative; due Week Ten or later)
  • Staging or adaptation for one scene from Midsummer Night’s Dream (collaborative; due Week Ten or later)
  • Regular journals that document and reflect upon service-learning (individual; due weekly or twice-weekly)
  • Final electronic portfolio including introductory reflective essay (individual; due on or before the time of the scheduled final examination. The portfolio replaces the examination).

Disclaimer: The syllabus outlines a basic plan for the course. Deviations may be necessary and will be announced to the class by the instructor online or face-to-face. 

Grading

Detailed Assignments List (adapted from Shakespeare Set Free (SSF) and Dr. Christy Desmet)

 

Weekly or Bi-Weekly Postings and Assignments: On a regular basis, we will work both in and out of class doing various activities: reflective journaling, exercises in SSF, poetry analysis, brief film analyses, and sometimes just plain administrative tasks such as gathering properties, collecting and curating links, and editing handouts. You will upload your assignments to as journals, “Projects,” or Forum postings, depending on the specific assignment (we’ll mostly upload these short assignments to the Journal on first draft, and then when we collaborate we’ll create a Google doc or shared doc and upload it to Edmodo).

Here are the major resources we will develop collaboratively:

?          Film Guide: This assignment asks you to choose a Shakespearean film for MND that is both widely available in DVD format and useful in the classroom and to develop for your fellow teachers a guide to that film, including information and analysis that will help them use the film in class. This is a more elaborate version of the SSF Lesson 11, “What Satisfaction Canst Thou Have Tonight?” on p. 154.

 

?          Play Concordance and Imagery Analysis: One of the most difficult aspects of reading (and teaching) Shakespeare is dealing with the language. The computer is a marvelous help with this task. For this assignment, you will choose a significant word or pair of words that can help students explicate your chosen play. Using the computer's “search” function, you will create a concordance of all instances of your chosen word, accompanied by an interpretive essay analyzing the image pattern. This is a more elaborate version of the SSF Lesson 15, “And Bring in Cloudy Night” on p. 168. 

?          Living Pictures: The Folger method of teaching Shakespeare very much privileges acting and speaking of the text: their motto is “Up on your feet!” In this assignment, you will edit a scene from your chosen play to fit a specified time frame and provide your actors with all of the apparatus (blocking instructions, glosses, etc.) for acting out the scene. This is a more elaborate version of the SSF Lesson 10 “And I Must Conjure Him” on p. 147. (See also SSF Lesson 3, "The Course of True Love Never Did Run Smooth," p. 48. For this class, Lesson Three might work better than Lesson Ten.)

?          Staging Workshop: One hallmark of drama is that it must be adapted to specific stages and performances, a fact that we tend to forget in the age of film. This assignment asks you to stage imaginatively in both words and images a key scene from your chosen play. This is a more elaborate version of the SSF Lesson 14 “Hold, Friends!” on p. 163. For our purposes, we should put together a version of this assignment that uses Midsummer Night’s Dream rather than RJ.

? Final Portfolio: since we’re such a small class, final portfolios can be tailored to individual students’ desires and requests. Your portfolio might contain some of your handouts and teaching materials as well as a longer individual project (an essay or a curriculum plan or a policy document) and an Introductory Reflective Essay (IRE).

Grading

Grading is holistic, but expect individual assignments to be weighted equally with participation and with group assignments. 

 

Attendance

Attendance

This is a service-learning class and we are working with a committed community partner. When we move over to the UGA classroom at Hilsman Middle School, you will become in a sense role models and ambassadors for lifelong learning and professional deportment to these children and their teachers. The Hilsman teachers and students need to know that you are dependable and that you prioritize your learning and your professional commitments. You need to come to class.

Anyone who misses more than four classes before the midpoint of the semester will be dropped from the class, with either a "WP" or a "WF."

Material

Material

Editions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream

 

• Shakespeare, William. A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Ed. Harold Brooks. Arden Shakespeare, Second Series. 1979. Repr. London: Thomson Learning, 2004, 2006. ISBN: 9781903436608. [Used copies available from $2.36]

• Shakespeare, William. A Midsummer Night’s Dream. No Fear Shakespeare. New York: Sparknotes. ISBN-10: 1586638459; ISBN-13: 978-1586638450. [No need to buy this one: can read this online at <http://nfs.sparknotes.com/msnd/>.]

 

 

• Shakespeare, William. A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Ed. Roma Gill. Oxford School Shakespeare. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. ISBN-10: 0198328664; ISBN-13: 978-0198328667.

 

•Shakespeare, William. A Midsummer Night's Dream. Ed. R.A. Foakes, Rex Gibson, et al. Cambridge School Shakespeare. New York and Cambridge, 2014. ISBN-10: 1107615453; ISBN-13: 978-1107615458

• Shakespeare, William. A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Texts and Contexts. Ed. Gail Kern Paster and Skiles Howard. Bedford Shakespeares. New York: Bedford, 1999. ISBN-10: 0312166214; ISBN-13: 978-0312166212.

• Shakespeare, William, and John McDonald. A Midsummer Night’s Dream: The Graphic Novel. New York: Classical Comics, 2009.

       • Shakespeare, William, and John McDonald. A Midsummer Night’s Dream: The Graphic Novel. New York: Classical Comics, 2009. ISBN-10: 1907127283

·         ISBN-13: 978-1907127281

[optional • Shakespeare, William, and Kate Brown. Manga Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night's Dream. New York: Amulet, 2008. ISBN-10: 0810994755; ISBN-13: 978-0810994751]

 

Textbooks and exercises

• O’Brien, Peggy. Shakespeare Set Free: Teaching A Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, and Macbeth. Folger Shakespeare Library. New York: Washington Square Press, 2006. ISBN-13: 978-0743288507. [SSF]

• Papp, Joseph, and Elizabeth Kirkland. Shakespeare Alive! New York: Bantam, 1988.  ISBN-10: 0553270818; ISBN-13: 978-0553270815. [SA]

Makeup Policy

Makeup Policy

No make-ups offered, but discuss conflicts with the instructor in case we can work something out.